Logging

 

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  1. 1913 Holt Track-type Tractor Hauling Logs
  2. A Logging Camp Cook Shack - Ford

    A Logging Camp Cook Shack - c. 1898

    The pies are on the table in this unusual indoor photo of an early cook shack, created entirely from natural light. Learn More
  3. A Logging Foreman Admires his Crew's Output - Ford

    A Logging Foreman Admires his Crew's Output - c. 1898

    Almost lost in the center of this giant pile of toothpicks is the foreman of the logging operation, posing on top of one of many large logs awaiting transport to a mill. Learn More
  4. A Small Steam Donkey Near Sandy - Douglass

    A Small Steam Donkey Near Sandy - c. 1910

    Two loggers take it easy while reclining on the cable spools of a steam donkey in this postcard view of logging in the Sandy area. Learn More
  5. A Young Logger in a Log Chute - Ford

    A Young Logger in a Log Chute - c. 1905

    While not signed by Ford, the original for this photo was acquired with other similarly formatted photos that were signed by him. Learn More
  6. At Work in the Woods - Ford

    At Work in the Woods - c. 1898

    Four men - and a dog - pose near medium-sized trees in an unknown location, probably on one side or the other of the lower Columbia River, where John F. Ford took many of his photographs. Learn More
  7. Bill Grisdale & Crew at Simpson's Camp No. 1, near Shelton
  8. Bringing the Logs Back to Camp - Ford

    Bringing the Logs Back to Camp - c. 1900

    Smaller logs are brought back to a logging camp by a team of six mules, pulling them along a skid-road of logs placed across the path. It appears that this logging camp also was home to a small sawmill, as stacked lumber can be seen behind the team. Learn More
  9. Bucker Ready to Crosscut a Ten-foot Diameter Fir - Kinsey

    Bucker Ready to Crosscut a Ten-foot Diameter Fir - 1915

    A logger hard at work bucking a huge ten foot fir stands on a smaller six-foot fir, which the caption on the original photo tells us was "a half-buried windfall which had been down more than a hundred years". Learn More
  10. Camp No. 2, Yeon and Pelton Company - Nelson

    Camp No. 2, Yeon and Pelton Company - c. 1902

    This group portrait of the logging crew at Camp 2 includes some other important people - the camp cook and several assistants. Learn More
  11. Choker Setters at Work, Deep in the Woods - Ford

    Choker Setters at Work, Deep in the Woods - c. 1898

    Chokers are lengths of cable with a sliding bell that are wrapped around logs in the woods, to allow them to be pulled out to the yard. In the era of this photo, power was provided by a steam donkey. Learn More
  12. Closeup of a Double-drum Steam Donkey - Ford

    Closeup of a Double-drum Steam Donkey - c. 1898

    Steam donkeys acquired their name from their origin on sailing ships, where the "donkey" engine was a secondary engine used to load and unload cargo, or raise the larger sails. Learn More
  13. Crew with Steam Donkey Powered Dragsaw

    Crew with Steam Donkey Powered Dragsaw - c. 1900

    This type of steam-powered crosscut saw, powered by a steam donkey, was called a dragsaw because it cut only on the drag stroke. Learn More
  14. Double-drum Steam Donkey Crew - Ford

    Double-drum Steam Donkey Crew - c. 1898

    Taken at a different location than most of our John Ford logging photographs, this view gives us a good look at the men and equipment involved in steam-powered logging over a century ago. Learn More
  15. Eight on a Log - Ford

    Eight on a Log - c. 1900

    How many ways can you pose a group of loggers? John F. Ford is known for his gift of creating poses that are artistically and visually interesting. Learn More
  16. Falling Fir Trees - Ford

    Falling Fir Trees - c. 1898

    A crew of two pose next to a "medium-sized" Douglas Fir in this logging image from Ilwaco photographer John F. Ford. Learn More
  17. Finishing a Log Raft on the Columbia River - Ford

    Finishing a Log Raft on the Columbia River - c. 1900

    This well-composed view of a cigar-shaped log raft was taken by John Ford on the lower Columbia, the area where he created most of his photos. Learn More
  18. Hauling Logs out with Mules - Ford

    Hauling Logs out with Mules - c. 1900

    Oxen and steam donkeys were the primary ways to bring logs out of the woods during this era, but mule teams and horses were sometimes used, especially for smaller logs. Learn More
  19. High Climber Alex Hallgren Scales a Spar Tree - Weister

    High Climber Axel Hallgren Scales a Spar Tree - 1921

    This image of high climber Hallgren was taken near Knappa, Oregon at the camp of the Big Creek Logging Company. Learn More
  20. High Lead Spar Mast, Dempsey Lumber Co. - Cress

    High Lead Spar Mast, Dempsey Lumber Co. - 1920

    This image was captured by Seattle photographer John D. Cress, who specialized in logging scenes and billed himself as "the Forest Fotographer". Learn More
  21. High-lead Yarding, Deer Island Logging Company - Clark Kinsey

    High-lead Yarding, Deer Island Logging Company - c. 1925

    By the 1920s, high-lead logging had replaced ground-lead logging for many operations in the Pacific Northwest. Both utilized steam donkeys to power cables pulling logs to the yarding area. Learn More
  22. Hoisting Logs from Pond to Mill at Palmer - White

    Hoisting Logs from Pond to Mill at Palmer - 1905

    At the Palmer Mill uphill from Bridal Veil, logs from the pond were hoisted by a power conveyor to the second floor to be rough-cut into timbers as their first step towards becoming finished lumber. Learn More
  23. Horse Logging near Bridal Veil - Towne

    Horse Logging near Bridal Veil - 1890s

    The photographer's title "Logging Near Bridal Veil" probably refers to the Columbia Gorge logging town of Bridal Veil, rather than the waterfall. Learn More
  24. In the Ponderosa Near Klamath Falls

    In the Ponderosa Near Klamath Falls - c. 1910

    The original for this detailed image of a stand of Ponderosa was a large print that hung for many years in the Weyerhaeuser offices in Klamath Falls. Learn More
  25. In Their Sunday Best - Ford

    In Their Sunday Best - c. 1898

    Five siblings line up on a rustic porch - likely in a logging camp - to pose for a family portrait. Their hats alone make the photo notable. Learn More
  26. Jack Screw Men and Steam Donkey - Ford

    Jack Screw Men and Steam Donkey - c. 1898

    The crew that uses the screw jacks to maneuver logs poses here in the yard in front of a covered steam donkey. Learn More
  27. Jack Screw Men Yarding a Large Log - Ford

    Jack Screw Men Yarding a Large Log - c. 1898

    A very old logging tool, the jack screw was used to move heavy logs, either in the woods to position them for hauling by oxen (and later by steam donkeys), or in the yards to roll the logs into position. Learn More
  28. Loading a Log Train near Redmond - Wallace

    Loading a Log Train near Redmond - c. 1905

    It looks pretty cold and damp in this scene of loading logs on railroad cars somewhere near Redmond in King County, Washington. Learn More
  29. Loading Logs with a Spar Pole - Corbett

    Loading Logs with a Spar Pole - c. 1925

    High lead logging, using a spar pole, became common in the Pacific Northwest in the 1920s. Soon the pole was adapted to help load railroad cars with logs for the mills. Learn More
  30. Loading Shingle Bolts on an Early Logging Truck - Helin

    Loading Shingle Bolts on an Early Logging Truck - c. 1918

    A 1918 license plate dates this photo of three men transferring shingle bolts from a skid to an early truck, somewhere in Washington state. Learn More
  31. Log Chute with Ox Teams

    Log Chute with Ox Teams - 1890s

    The original title for this magic lantern glass slide was simply "Log Shute, Oregon, U.S.A." Learn More
  32. Log Drivers on the Cowlitz River

    Log Drivers on the Cowlitz River - c. 1905

    A group of log drivers, sometimes called "river hogs", pose with their pikes - the long poles used to maneuver logs as they moved down the river to sawmills. Learn More
  33. Log Drivers on their Wanigan, Cowlitz River - Teasley

    Log Drivers on their Wanigan, Cowlitz River - c. 1905

    Log drivers helped maneuver log rafts down rivers to sawmills. Here a group poses in front of their wanigan, a floating kitchen that accompanied them on their journey. Learn More
  34. Log Raft from Oregon Arrives in San Diego - NY State Education Dept

    Log Raft from Oregon Arrives in San Diego - 1929

    Most photos of sea-going log rafts show them being prepared to leave Oregon. This view shows a raft after it has arrived at its destination. Learn More
  35. Log Raft, Lower Columbia River - Ford
  36. Log Rafts Above Suspension Bridge, Willamette Falls

    Log Rafts Above Suspension Bridge, Willamette Falls - 1897

    For decades, much of the traffic through Willamette Falls Locks was log rafts, moving downstream to Portland area sawmills, and often beyond. Learn More
  37. Logging "Roll Way", with Tracks, Yard & Steam Donkey - Ford

    Logging "Roll Way", with Tracks, Yard & Steam Donkey - c. 1898

    A good overview of many aspects of a turn-of-the-last-century logging operation, captured here by Portland photographer John F. Ford. Learn More
  38. Logging Camp, Deep in the Woods - Ford
  39. Logging Crew & Steam Donkey near Sandy - Douglass

    Logging Crew & Steam Donkey near Sandy - c. 1910

    The crew relaxes for their photo for a postcard by H. M. Douglass, part of a set of three logging scenes from the Sandy, Oregon area. Learn More
  40. Logging Crew with Oxen & Steam Donkey

    Logging Crew with Oxen & Steam Donkey - c. 1900

    This turn-of-the-last-century view shows a logging crew using both ox teams and a steam donkey to move their logs. It appears the oxen brought the logs down the slope, and then the steam donkey pulled them along a more level skid road to this staging area. Learn More
  41. Logging Crew with Their Steam Donkey - Ford

    Logging Crew with Their Steam Donkey - c. 1898

    Everyone gets into the picture in this John Ford photo of a double-drum steam donkey. It's likely summer, as the crew hasn't bothered with a roof for the operators. Learn More
  42. Logjam on the Upper Willamette

    Logjam on the Upper Willamette - c. 1900

    Two steamboats arrive to help clear out a logjam under a bridge somewhere on the upper Willamette River. Learn More
  43. Logs on the Willamette, Looking Towards Pete's Mountain - Tibbitts

    Logs on the Willamette, Looking Towards Pete's Mountain - c. 1908

    This image of log rafts on the Willamette, above the Falls, gives us an idea of how many logs were taken downstream from forests in the upper Willamette Valley. Learn More
  44. Lumbering with Oxen near Olympia
  45. Oregon Water Power & Railway Cars at Logging Camp - Indahl

    Oregon Water Power & Railway Cars at Logging Camp - c. 1905

    This rural-looking scene is likely somewhere in east Multnomah County, along the line of the O. W. P. & Ry. Company, a name that lasted for only four years in the early 1900s. Learn More
  46. Overview of a Small Saw Mill near Sandy - Douglass

    Overview of a Small Saw Mill near Sandy - c. 1910

    The original caption for this photo called it a "Typical Sandy Saw Mill", and it's likely there were a number of small, homestead-based mills like it in the Sandy area. Learn More
  47. Palmer to Bridal Veil Lumber Flume - White

    Palmer to Bridal Veil Lumber Flume - 1904

    If you have both water and gravity, a flume is an ideal way to move logs or lumber from the top to the bottom of a hill. Learn More
  48. Pond Monkey Guides Logs from Pond to Chute - Lange

    Pond Monkey Guides Logs from Pond to Chute - 1939

    The "pond monkey" position in a sawmill has been described as the next-to-the-last step in a logging career; the last being night watchman. Learn More
  49. Pond Monkeys - Ford

    Pond Monkeys - c. 1898

    Pond Monkeys were men who hopped from log to log in a mill pond, guiding the floating logs into the intake for the sawmill. This Ford photos shows a large group - likely more than would normally work together. Learn More
  50. Pondering an Accident on the Benson Logging Train - Ford

    Pondering an Accident on the Benson Logging Train - c. 1900

    In this wonderfully detailed John F. Ford photo, a group of concerned workers discuss their next move after a large log has broken loose and severely damaged the firewood tender for the Benson Logging & Lumber Company train. Learn More

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