Logging - Fine Art Prints of Historical Photos from the Pacific Northwest

 

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  1. A Small but Mighty Logging Steam Engine

    A Small but Mighty Logging Steam Engine - circa 1900

    This logging engine appears to be partly hand-made by the logging company that utilized it - particularly the wooden components. Learn More
  2. A Young Logger in a Log Chute - Ford

    A Young Logger in a Log Chute - c. 1905

    While not signed by Ford, the original for this photo was acquired with other similarly formatted photos that were signed by him. Learn More
  3. After Supper at Mack's Camp, Elma, Washington - H. G. Nelson

    After Supper at Mack's Camp, Elma, Washington, c. 1905

    A group of loggers poses on the tracks in their camp at Elma, in Grays Harbor County on the west end of Washington State. The size of the kitchen crew indicates they were well fed! Learn More
  4. Benson Logging Railroad Through Tall Trees - Ford

    Benson Logging Railroad Through Tall Trees - c. 1905

    Simon Benson was a technical innovator, and one of the first to use logging railroads rather than ox teams to haul his cut logs to the river. Learn More
  5. Logging - Bill Grisdale & Crew at Simpson's Camp No. 1, near Shelton

    Bill Grisdale & Crew at Simpson's Camp No. 1, near Shelton - c. 1900

    Bill Grisdale, in the white shirt standing beside the tender, was the nephew of Sol Simpson, who founded Simpson Logging Company in 1890. Learn More
  6. Logging - Bringing the Logs Back to Camp - Ford

    Bringing the Logs Back to Camp - c. 1900

    Smaller logs are brought back to a logging camp by a team of six mules, pulling them along a skid-road of logs placed across the path. It appears that this logging camp also was home to a small sawmill, as stacked lumber can be seen behind the team. Learn More
  7. Logging - Camp No. 2, Yeon and Pelton Company - Nelson

    Camp No. 2, Yeon and Pelton Company - c. 1902

    This group portrait of the logging crew at Camp 2 includes some other important people - the camp cook and several assistants. Learn More
  8. Logging - Crew with Steam Donkey Powered Dragsaw

    Crew with Steam Donkey Powered Dragsaw - c. 1900

    This type of steam-powered crosscut saw, powered by a steam donkey, was called a dragsaw because it cut only on the drag stroke. Learn More
  9. Logging - Eight on a Log - Ford

    Eight on a Log - c. 1900

    How many ways can you pose a group of loggers? John F. Ford is known for his gift of creating poses that are artistically and visually interesting. Learn More
  10. Logging - Finishing a Log Raft on the Columbia River - Ford

    Finishing a Log Raft on the Columbia River - c. 1900

    This well-composed view of a cigar-shaped log raft was taken by John Ford on the lower Columbia, the area where he created most of his photos. Learn More
  11. Hauling Logs on a Horse-drawn Wooden Railway - Worthington

    Hauling Logs on a Horse-drawn Wooden Railway - c. 1900

    Horses had been used to pull railroad cars for at least a century when this photo was taken - in mines, for portage railroads, in cities for trolleys, and in the woods to haul logs. Learn More
  12. Logging - Hauling Logs out with Mules - Ford

    Hauling Logs out with Mules - c. 1900

    Oxen and steam donkeys were the primary ways to bring logs out of the woods during this era, but mule teams and horses were sometimes used, especially for smaller logs. Learn More
  13. Hoisting Logs from Pond to Mill at Palmer - White

    Hoisting Logs from Pond to Mill at Palmer - 1905

    At the Palmer Mill uphill from Bridal Veil, logs from the pond were hoisted by a power conveyor to the second floor to be rough-cut into timbers as their first step towards becoming finished lumber. Learn More
  14. Loading a Log Train near Redmond - Wallace

    Loading a Log Train near Redmond - c. 1905

    It looks pretty cold and damp in this scene of loading logs on railroad cars somewhere near Redmond in King County, Washington. Learn More
  15. Log Drivers on the Cowlitz River

    Log Drivers on the Cowlitz River - c. 1905

    A group of log drivers, sometimes called "river hogs", pose with their pikes - the long poles used to maneuver logs as they moved down the river to sawmills. Learn More
  16. Log Drivers on their Wanigan, Cowlitz River - Teasley

    Log Drivers on their Wanigan, Cowlitz River - c. 1905

    Log drivers helped maneuver log rafts down rivers to sawmills. Here a group poses in front of their wanigan, a floating kitchen that accompanied them on their journey. Learn More
  17. Log Raft, Lower Columbia River - Ford

    Log Raft, Lower Columbia River - c. 1900

    This portrait of an ocean-going log raft places its building in context, with some support buildings on the shore to the left, and a couple of tugs awaiting it in the right background. Learn More
  18. Log Rafts Below Willamette Falls Locks

    Log Rafts Below Willamette Falls Locks - c. 1905

    This classic view looks upstream below the locks and above them, Willamette Falls. Learn More
  19. Logging Crew with Oxen & Steam Donkey

    Logging Crew with Oxen & Steam Donkey - c. 1900

    This turn-of-the-last-century view shows a logging crew using both ox teams and a steam donkey to move their logs. It appears the oxen brought the logs down the slope, and then the steam donkey pulled them along a more level skid road to this staging area. Learn More
  20. Logjam on the Upper Willamette

    Logjam on the Upper Willamette - c. 1900

    Two steamboats arrive to help clear out a logjam under a bridge somewhere on the upper Willamette River. Learn More
  21. Logs on the Willamette, Looking Towards Pete's Mountain - Tibbitts

    Logs on the Willamette, Looking Towards Pete's Mountain - c. 1908

    This image of log rafts on the Willamette, above the Falls, gives us an idea of how many logs were taken downstream from forests in the upper Willamette Valley. Learn More
  22. North Bend Number 1 Ready to Unload Logs - Ernest A. Stauff

    North Bend Number 1 Ready to Unload Logs - c. 1900

    The crew of this southern Oregon logging train pauses for a photo before unloading their logs into the waiting pond. Learn More
  23. Oregon Water Power & Railway Cars at Logging Camp - Indahl

    Oregon Water Power & Railway Cars at Logging Camp - c. 1905

    This rural-looking scene is likely somewhere in east Multnomah County, along the line of the O. W. P. & Ry. Company, a name that lasted for only four years in the early 1900s. Learn More
  24. Oxteam Entering a Tunnel Below Clatskanie - John F. Ford
  25. Palmer to Bridal Veil Lumber Flume - White

    Palmer to Bridal Veil Lumber Flume - 1904

    If you have both water and gravity, a flume is an ideal way to move logs or lumber from the top to the bottom of a hill. Learn More
  26. Pondering an Accident on the Benson Logging Train - Ford

    Pondering an Accident on the Benson Logging Train - c. 1900

    In this wonderfully detailed John F. Ford photo, a group of concerned workers discuss their next move after a large log has broken loose and severely damaged the firewood tender for the Benson Logging & Lumber Company train. Learn More
  27. Sawmill Gang and Mill at Round Lake

    Sawmill Gang and Mill at Round Lake - c. 1905

    The muddy yard hints at the Pacific Northwest location of this small mill near Round Lake, north of Camas, Washington in Clark County. The term "gang" comes from the handwritten title on the original photo. Learn More
  28. Six-horse Team at Wolman's Landing - Smith

    Six-horse Team at Wolman's Landing - c. 1900

    An alert six-horse team and three handlers pose for a photo along a waterway somewhere in Washington State. Learn More
  29. Sledding a Large Log near Elgin

    Sledding a Large Log near Elgin - c. 1905

    Winter was a good time to move large logs; the ground was frozen hard and skids moved smoothly across the snow. Learn More
  30. Small Trestle on a Logging Skid Road - John F. Ford

    Small Trestle on a Logging Skid Road - c. 1900

    What do you do if you need to run a logging skid road across a ravine? You build a small trestle, like this one.

    Learn More
  31. Steam Schooner Arctic with Log Raft - Ford

    Steam Schooner Arctic with Log Raft - c. 1902

    The steam tug in the foreground is the "Arctic", built in Bay City, Oregon in 1901 for the J. S. Kimball Company of San Francisco. Learn More
  32. Sternwheelers M. F. Henderson & Shaver with Log Raft

    Sternwheelers M. F. Henderson & Shaver with Log Raft - c. 1905

    The two named sternwheelers escort a large log raft down the Columbia at the beginning of its voyage in the Pacific, probably to San Diego. while three and four masted sailing ships wait in the background. Learn More
  33. Two Ways to Move Logs by Raiload - White

    Two Ways to Move Logs by Raiload - 1904

    This view demonstrates large logs can be pushed ahead of a steam engine, or pulled behind while loaded on flatcars. Learn More
  34. We'll Show 'Em how to Fell Big Trees - Keystone

    We'll Show 'Em How to Fell Big Trees - 1903

    "We'll Show 'Em how to Fell Big Trees", from a Keystone novelty glass slide. Learn More
  35. Willamette Falls Railway, Woodyard Across the Tualatin

    Willamette Falls Railway, Woodyard Across the Tualatin - c. 1900

    Gathering wood for the paper mills at Willamette Falls was one of the main purposes of the Willamette Falls Railway, though it also provided passenger service for local families. Learn More

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