Logging - Fine Art Prints of Historical Photos from the Pacific Northwest

 

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  1. Logging - 1913 Holt Track-type Tractor Hauling Logs

    1913 Holt Track-type Tractor Hauling Logs - 1914

    This U. S.Reclamation Service tractor was used to haul logs to the lake at Kachess Dam, in Kittitas County, Washington. Learn More
  2. 3 1/2 ton Kelly-Springfield Truck Hauling a Steam Donkey

    3 1/2 ton Kelly-Springfield Truck Hauling a Steam Donkey - c. 1917

    While steam donkeys for logging were equipped with skids to allow them to be moved about in the woods, sometimes it was necessary to move them longer distances to new camps. Learn More
  3. A Logging Foreman Admires his Crew's Output - Ford

    A Logging Foreman Admires his Crew's Output - c. 1898

    Almost lost in the center of this giant pile of toothpicks is the foreman of the logging operation, posing on top of one of many large logs awaiting transport to a mill. Learn More
  4. A Small but Mighty Logging Steam Engine

    A Small but Mighty Logging Steam Engine - circa 1900

    This logging engine appears to be partly hand-made by the logging company that utilized it - particularly the wooden components. Learn More
  5. After Supper at Mack's Camp, Elma, Washington - H. G. Nelson

    After Supper at Mack's Camp, Elma, Washington, c. 1905

    A group of loggers poses on the tracks in their camp at Elma, in Grays Harbor County on the west end of Washington State. The size of the kitchen crew indicates they were well fed! Learn More
  6. Logging - Bill Grisdale & Crew at Simpson's Camp No. 1, near Shelton

    Bill Grisdale & Crew at Simpson's Camp No. 1, near Shelton - c. 1900

    Bill Grisdale, in the white shirt standing beside the tender, was the nephew of Sol Simpson, who founded Simpson Logging Company in 1890. Learn More
  7. Logging - Bucker Ready to Crosscut a Ten-foot Diameter Fir - Kinsey

    Bucker Ready to Crosscut a Ten-foot Diameter Fir - 1915

    A logger hard at work bucking a huge ten foot fir stands on a smaller six-foot fir, which the caption on the original photo tells us was "a half-buried windfall which had been down more than a hundred years". Learn More
  8. Logging - Choker Setters at Work, Deep in the Woods - Ford

    Choker Setters at Work, Deep in the Woods - c. 1898

    Chokers are lengths of cable with a sliding bell that are wrapped around logs in the woods, to allow them to be pulled out to the yard. In the era of this photo, power was provided by a steam donkey. Learn More
  9. Logging - Closeup of a Double-drum Steam Donkey - Ford

    Closeup of a Double-drum Steam Donkey - c. 1898

    Steam donkeys acquired their name from their origin on sailing ships, where the "donkey" engine was a secondary engine used to load and unload cargo, or raise the larger sails. Learn More
  10. County Road Crew Near Hoodsport - Mitchell

    County Road Crew Near Hoodsport - c. 1895

    At first glance this group portrait appears to be a very diverse logging crew, but a second look reveals that in addition to saws and peaveys, many shovels and grub hoes are visible. Learn More
  11. Crew with Early GMC 3 1/2 Ton Logging Truck - Webster and Stevens

    Crew with Early GMC 3 1/2 Ton Logging Truck - 1917

    This 1917 photo shows a crew and their early GMC logging truck - one of the first GMC models to feature worm-drive (with a drive shaft) instead of chain drive. Learn More
  12. Logging - Crew with Steam Donkey Powered Dragsaw

    Crew with Steam Donkey Powered Dragsaw - c. 1900

    This type of steam-powered crosscut saw, powered by a steam donkey, was called a dragsaw because it cut only on the drag stroke. Learn More
  13. Logging - High Climber Alex Hallgren Scales a Spar Tree - Weister

    High Climber Axel Hallgren Scales a Spar Tree - 1921

    This image of high climber Hallgren was taken near Knappa, Oregon at the camp of the Big Creek Logging Company. Learn More
  14. Logging - High Lead Spar Mast, Dempsey Lumber Co. - Cress

    High Lead Spar Mast, Dempsey Lumber Co. - 1920

    This image was captured by Seattle photographer John D. Cress, who specialized in logging scenes and billed himself as "the Forest Fotographer". Learn More
  15. Jack Screw Men and Steam Donkey - Ford

    Jack Screw Men and Steam Donkey - c. 1898

    The crew that uses the screw jacks to maneuver logs poses here in the yard in front of a covered steam donkey. Learn More
  16. Jack Screw Men Yarding a Large Log - Ford

    Jack Screw Men Yarding a Large Log - c. 1898

    A very old logging tool, the jack screw was used to move heavy logs, either in the woods to position them for hauling by oxen (and later by steam donkeys), or in the yards to roll the logs into position. Learn More
  17. Loading a Log Train near Redmond - Wallace

    Loading a Log Train near Redmond - c. 1905

    It looks pretty cold and damp in this scene of loading logs on railroad cars somewhere near Redmond in King County, Washington. Learn More
  18. Loading Logs with a Spar Pole - Corbett

    Loading Logs with a Spar Pole - c. 1925

    High lead logging, using a spar pole, became common in the Pacific Northwest in the 1920s. Soon the pole was adapted to help load railroad cars with logs for the mills. Learn More
  19. Loading Shingle Bolts on an Early Logging Truck - Helin

    Loading Shingle Bolts on an Early Logging Truck - c. 1918

    A 1918 license plate dates this photo of three men transferring shingle bolts from a skid to an early truck, somewhere in Washington state. Learn More
  20. Log Drivers on the Cowlitz River

    Log Drivers on the Cowlitz River - c. 1905

    A group of log drivers, sometimes called "river hogs", pose with their pikes - the long poles used to maneuver logs as they moved down the river to sawmills. Learn More
  21. Log Drivers on their Wanigan, Cowlitz River - Teasley

    Log Drivers on their Wanigan, Cowlitz River - c. 1905

    Log drivers helped maneuver log rafts down rivers to sawmills. Here a group poses in front of their wanigan, a floating kitchen that accompanied them on their journey. Learn More
  22. Log Train in Northwest Washington - Cress

    Log Train in Northwest Washington - c. 1925

    Photographer Cress's notes state, "Three to six logs usually constitute a carload, sometimes a single log." Learn More
  23. Logging "Roll Way", with Tracks, Yard & Steam Donkey - Ford

    Logging "Roll Way", with Tracks, Yard & Steam Donkey - c. 1898

    A good overview of many aspects of a turn-of-the-last-century logging operation, captured here by Portland photographer John F. Ford. Learn More
  24. Logging Crew with Their Steam Donkey - Ford

    Logging Crew with Their Steam Donkey - c. 1898

    Everyone gets into the picture in this John Ford photo of a double-drum steam donkey. It's likely summer, as the crew hasn't bothered with a roof for the operators. Learn More
  25. Lumbering with Oxen near Olympia

    Lumbering with Oxen near Olympia - c. 1890

    An unknown photographer found this spot where he could pose two timber fallers next to a skid road used for oxen to haul logs to a landing. Learn More
  26. Preparing to Saw Up a Newly Felled Tree - Ford

    Preparing to Saw Up a Newly Felled Tree - c. 1898

    While this is a staged photo, the logger in front is demonstrating the actual saw that he will use for "sawing up", the process of cutting the felled tree into lengths that can be transported to a mill. Learn More
  27. Rolling a Large Log onto a GMC Logging Truck - Webster and Stevens

    Rolling a Large Log onto a GMC Logging Truck - 1919

    Another photo in this series shows the crew loading smaller logs using a hoist, but apparently this log is too heavy for that process. Learn More
  28. Saldern's Logging Road, 13 1/2 Percent Grade - Ford

    Saldern's Logging Road, 13 1/2 Percent Grade - c. 1898

    Climax Engine Number 2 works to push three large logs up a steep grade near Grays River in southwest Washington. Learn More
  29. Sawing Up - Ford

    Sawing Up - c. 1898

    Falling big trees was only the beginning. It took many more hours to saw up each tree - to cut it into sections that could be hauled back to the yard, using cables from a steam donkey. Learn More
  30. Sawmill Gang and Mill at Round Lake

    Sawmill Gang and Mill at Round Lake - c. 1905

    The muddy yard hints at the Pacific Northwest location of this small mill near Round Lake, north of Camas, Washington in Clark County. The term "gang" comes from the handwritten title on the original photo. Learn More
  31. Six-horse Team at Wolman's Landing - Smith

    Six-horse Team at Wolman's Landing - c. 1900

    An alert six-horse team and three handlers pose for a photo along a waterway somewhere in Washington State. Learn More
  32. Sledding Shake Bolts with an Ox Team - Darius Kinsey

    Sledding Shake Bolts with an Ox Team - c. 1910

    First displaced by draft horses, then later by steam donkeys, oxen were still used in Northwest forests in 1910. Learn More
  33. Small Trestle on a Logging Skid Road - John F. Ford

    Small Trestle on a Logging Skid Road - c. 1900

    What do you do if you need to run a logging skid road across a ravine? You build a small trestle, like this one.

    Learn More
  34. Soldiers in Hoquiam Logging Camp - Bain News Service

    Soldiers in Hoquiam Logging Camp - 1918

    Starting in 1917 the Army sent 10,000 soldiers to Oregon and Washington logging camps to cut timber as part of an effort to harvest 10 million board-feet of spruce a month for aircraft construction. Learn More
  35. Steam Donkey Under a Small Shed - Ford

    Steam Donkey Under a Small Shed - c. 1898

    Another in a series of detailed logging photos by John F. Ford, this view shows the type of small shed often constructed around steam donkeys to protect the operators (and the machinery) from the worst of the weather. Learn More
  36. Steam Schooner Arctic with Log Raft - Ford

    Steam Schooner Arctic with Log Raft - c. 1902

    The steam tug in the foreground is the "Arctic", built in Bay City, Oregon in 1901 for the J. S. Kimball Company of San Francisco. Learn More
  37. The Largest Fir Tree in Washington - Clark Kinsey

    The Largest Fir Tree in Washington - c. 1925

    This image is from a large (10 x 13 inch) print created by Clark Kinsey, brother of the somewhat better-known photographer Darius Kinsey. Learn More
  38. The Soldrens Crew Pauses in a Cut on their Logging Road - Ford

    The Saldern Crew Pauses in a Cut on their Logging Road - c. 1898

    The logging crew poses in a substantial earth cut made for the logging railroad that supported their operation. It's not clear whether these men helped build the railroad grade as well as doing the logging. Learn More
  39. Two Timber Fallers Begin Their Saw Cut - Ford

    Two Timber Fallers Begin Their Saw Cut - c. 1898

    A classic scene - this photo shows two fallers standing on their springboards, starting their sawcut to fall a substantial Douglas Fir. Learn More
  40. Weyerhaeuser Railroad Logging Camps 4 & 3 - Clark Kinsey
  41. Willamette Tower Skidder at Crown Willamette, Cathlamet - Harold M. Brown

    Willamette Tower Skidder at Crown Willamette, Cathlamet - 1927

    One of the largest logging machines ever built, this Willamette Tower Skidder was over 100 feet high and weighed about 475,000 pounds. Learn More
  42. Yarding the Big Logs - Ford

    Yarding the Big Logs - c. 1898

    This well organized yarding area run by Saldern Logging Company near Grays River, Washington, demonstrates how logging crews staged their large logs till they could be loaded on railroad cars for a trip to the mill. Learn More

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